Belfast Summer School of Traditional Music
31st July - 4th August 2017

Classes

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MUSIC MASTERCLASSES

The team of international tutors is made up of master performers with proven track records as teachers and educationalists. The primary means of teaching and learning is ‘by ear’ with an emphasis in the less experienced classes of assisting pupils to develop oral/aural skills in addition to instrumental competency and developing core repertoire.

  • Classes take place Monday 31st July - Friday 4th August 2017 10:00am - 1:00pm at Ulster University Belfast Campus on York Street.
  • Classes are designed for intermediate to advanced (minimum 2 years instrument experience) adults and children over 6 years of age with exception of the Traditional Singing Classes, Fiddle Classes and unless specifically titled a 'Beginners Class'. See individual classes for full details. 
  • Fee includes admission to all programme events with exception of evening concerts and the Trad Trail.

Highland Piping with Allan MacDonald

Highland Piping with Allan MacDonald

95.00

Classes take place Monday 31st July - Friday 4th August 2017 10:00am - 1:00pm at Ulster University Belfast Campus.

This class is designed for Intermediate to Advanced adults and children over 6 years of age.

Fee includes admission to all programme events with exception of evening concerts. 

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Allan McDonald was born in 1956 and raised in the Gaelic-speaking community of Glenuig on the west coast of Scotland in a family that includes two equally famous piping MacDonald brothers: Iain and Dr. Angus. His playing reflects a style of power and rhythm deeply rooted in the Highlands of Scotland. His innovative quick-waltz arrangement for “The Foxhunter’s” jig caught on in a 78th Fraser Highlanders medley that won the 1987 World Pipe Band Championship and can probably be considered the official launch of that extremely popular time signature in the piping world today. His slow airs and reels have also moved the tradition forward, though with a firm grasp on the past.

In 1995, Allan finished a M.Litt thesis at the University of Edinburgh’s School of Scottish Studies that explored the relationship between piobaireachd and Gaelic language rhythms in song. From this work came radical new interpretations of piobaireachd that he has played frequently in public and on his 2007 recording Dastirum. Earlier recordings with Gaelic singer Margaret Stewart –Fhuair mi pog (1998) and Colla mo Run (2001) – also explored this theme, both on Highland pipes and small pipes.

Allan currently lives in Edinburgh and teaches at the National Piping Centre in Glasgow where he specializes in the degree program offered by the Centre in conjunction with the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. Few pipers are more in demand at traditional music workshops and festivals on the European continent.